Holdin' Hands   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2015  The project  Chingona Por Vida  investigates the shortcomings of visual perception and the complexity of intersectional Latinx and queer identities. Via photography, video, and installation, and through the lens of the central subject, Chingona, the project mines personal and familial histories of migration and assimilation as one family migrates from Mexico to the United States. Personal struggle for cultural recognition is explored alongside the complex and fraught history of the annexation of Mexico and its impact on geopolitics and individuals’ lives. Overlaying personal narrative, the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the current geopolitical situation of U.S. and Mexico border relations and immigration policies, the project seeks to both humanize and complicate the cultural understanding and perception of what it means to be Mexican American and queer Latinx today.

Holdin' Hands

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2015

The project Chingona Por Vida investigates the shortcomings of visual perception and the complexity of intersectional Latinx and queer identities. Via photography, video, and installation, and through the lens of the central subject, Chingona, the project mines personal and familial histories of migration and assimilation as one family migrates from Mexico to the United States. Personal struggle for cultural recognition is explored alongside the complex and fraught history of the annexation of Mexico and its impact on geopolitics and individuals’ lives. Overlaying personal narrative, the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the current geopolitical situation of U.S. and Mexico border relations and immigration policies, the project seeks to both humanize and complicate the cultural understanding and perception of what it means to be Mexican American and queer Latinx today.

  California Dream   Archival Inkjet, 20” x 30,” 2015  From  Chingona Por Vida

California Dream

Archival Inkjet, 20” x 30,” 2015

From Chingona Por Vida

  Chingona   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 48,” 2017  From  Chingona Por Vida

Chingona

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 48,” 2017

From Chingona Por Vida

  Map of Mexifornia   Retouched and reprinted found maps, map tacs, text, various sizes aprox. 30” x 40,” 2017  From  Chingona Por Vida   Overlaying personal narrative, the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the current geopolitical situation of U.S. and Mexico border relations and immigration policies, the project seeks to both humanize and complicate the cultural understanding and perception of what it means to be Mexican American and queer Latinx today. Taking on the aesthetics of natural history museums the points of interest on the maps reflect points of personal and familiar import along with the history of the annexation of Mexico.  The treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. With the defeat of its army and the fall of the capital, in 1848 Mexico entered into negotiations to end the Mexican-American War (1846-48). February 2, 1848 the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was signed between the U.S. and Mexico, ending the war and forcing Mexico to give the U.S. 55% of its land. Mexico relinquished the territories of Alta California and Santa Fe de Nuevo Mexico – which are now the U.S. States of California, New Mexico, Utah, Colorado, Arizona and Texas. This unfair treaty paved the way for the national oppression of Chicano people in what had been the top half of Mexico and is now the Southwestern United States.

Map of Mexifornia

Retouched and reprinted found maps, map tacs, text, various sizes aprox. 30” x 40,” 2017

From Chingona Por Vida

Overlaying personal narrative, the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the current geopolitical situation of U.S. and Mexico border relations and immigration policies, the project seeks to both humanize and complicate the cultural understanding and perception of what it means to be Mexican American and queer Latinx today. Taking on the aesthetics of natural history museums the points of interest on the maps reflect points of personal and familiar import along with the history of the annexation of Mexico.

The treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. With the defeat of its army and the fall of the capital, in 1848 Mexico entered into negotiations to end the Mexican-American War (1846-48). February 2, 1848 the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was signed between the U.S. and Mexico, ending the war and forcing Mexico to give the U.S. 55% of its land. Mexico relinquished the territories of Alta California and Santa Fe de Nuevo Mexico – which are now the U.S. States of California, New Mexico, Utah, Colorado, Arizona and Texas. This unfair treaty paved the way for the national oppression of Chicano people in what had been the top half of Mexico and is now the Southwestern United States.

  Objetos Sagrados    Daguerreotype, 5” x 7,” 2016  From  Chingona Por Vida

Objetos Sagrados

Daguerreotype, 5” x 7,” 2016

From Chingona Por Vida

Criminal

Video, 4:07, dimensions variable, 2015

From Gangsters Revisited

  Club Kid Corazón   Mixed media including, soft sculpture, feaux flowers, disco ball, pom poms, 10,’ x 10,’ x 15’, 2018  From  Alteras   Site specific, multi-media installation, exploring the intersectional border space of queer and Latinx community, inserting an expansive space of queer utopia and Latinx cultural worship into the physical space of the gallery. Part of a series of installations.  These alter installations take into account Mexican and LatinX traditions while also cross-pollinating said traditions with queer and trans histories, aesthetics and practices. Recalling members of the queer community we have lost and celebrating them while also demonstrating an intersectional queer utopian impulse toward remembering our ancestors while fighting for the future.  Dia de Los Muertos is a multi-day holiday, celebrated in early November throughout LatinX cultures especially in Mexico, where it originated. It draws on indigenous Mexican traditions and is observed throughout the world particularly by people of Mexican ancestry. Di de Los Muertos celebrates the lives of the deceased with food, drink, parties, and activities the dead enjoyed in life. Alters are a typical cultural form of recognition of the dead during this holiday.

Club Kid Corazón

Mixed media including, soft sculpture, feaux flowers, disco ball, pom poms, 10,’ x 10,’ x 15’, 2018

From Alteras

Site specific, multi-media installation, exploring the intersectional border space of queer and Latinx community, inserting an expansive space of queer utopia and Latinx cultural worship into the physical space of the gallery. Part of a series of installations.

These alter installations take into account Mexican and LatinX traditions while also cross-pollinating said traditions with queer and trans histories, aesthetics and practices. Recalling members of the queer community we have lost and celebrating them while also demonstrating an intersectional queer utopian impulse toward remembering our ancestors while fighting for the future.

Dia de Los Muertos is a multi-day holiday, celebrated in early November throughout LatinX cultures especially in Mexico, where it originated. It draws on indigenous Mexican traditions and is observed throughout the world particularly by people of Mexican ancestry. Di de Los Muertos celebrates the lives of the deceased with food, drink, parties, and activities the dead enjoyed in life. Alters are a typical cultural form of recognition of the dead during this holiday.

  Gender is a Drag (Triptych)   Archival Inkjets, dimensions variable, 2016-ongoing    From ongoing project  Gender is a Drag   The series,  Gender is a Drag , a photo and video based work that explores and expands the space of non-binary gender. These photograph are part of a body of work comprised of videos and stills documenting the transformations I undergo due to taking hormones. There are also videos in which I discuss various topics related to gender in general, gender theory, my own experience and concepts that I am researching in conjunction with this work. Being white, able-bodied and often viewed as masculine, allows me to remain relatively safe as a non-binary person. I am in a position where I can use my privilege to make more space for non-binary and gender non-conforming people.

Gender is a Drag (Triptych)

Archival Inkjets, dimensions variable, 2016-ongoing

From ongoing project Gender is a Drag

The series, Gender is a Drag, a photo and video based work that explores and expands the space of non-binary gender. These photograph are part of a body of work comprised of videos and stills documenting the transformations I undergo due to taking hormones. There are also videos in which I discuss various topics related to gender in general, gender theory, my own experience and concepts that I am researching in conjunction with this work. Being white, able-bodied and often viewed as masculine, allows me to remain relatively safe as a non-binary person. I am in a position where I can use my privilege to make more space for non-binary and gender non-conforming people.

  Needle and Vial   Archival Inkjet, dimensions variable, 2017  From ongoing project  Gender is a Drag

Needle and Vial

Archival Inkjet, dimensions variable, 2017

From ongoing project Gender is a Drag

  Shot   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2018  From ongoing project  Gender is a Drag

Shot

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2018

From ongoing project Gender is a Drag

  Shot   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2018  From ongoing project  Gender is a Drag

Shot

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2018

From ongoing project Gender is a Drag

  Evolve   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2017  From ongoing project  Gender is a Drag

Evolve

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2017

From ongoing project Gender is a Drag

Gender Is A Drag

Video, 5:52, dimensions variable, 2018

From ongoing project Gender is a Drag

With the increasingly popularized use of “they” as a non-binary gendered singular pronoun, people are becoming aware that not everyone fits neatly under the pronoun she or he. Rather than being excited by the possibility of new ways of being, when met with expansive forms of self-expression (i.e. people who are gender non-conforming and/or non-binary, and/or non-binary trans) most people are frightened and / or enraged by the existence of people who present identities that have not been authorized by dominant culture. We see this regularly in with the rights for trans bathroom bills, with the murder of gender non-conforming people and violence and hate crimes perpetrated against non-binary people.

  The Living Room   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2014  From an ongoing body of work investigating addiction, dysfunction, familial relations and the struggle of working class Americans.

The Living Room

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2014

From an ongoing body of work investigating addiction, dysfunction, familial relations and the struggle of working class Americans.

  Kurt and Kenny   Archival Inkjet, 40” x 50,” 2017  From an ongoing body of work investigating addiction, dysfunction, familial relations and the struggle of working class Americans.

Kurt and Kenny

Archival Inkjet, 40” x 50,” 2017

From an ongoing body of work investigating addiction, dysfunction, familial relations and the struggle of working class Americans.

  Logan Before and After   Archival Inkjets, dimensions variable, 2011-2013  From a series of portraits of trans and queer subjects.

Logan Before and After

Archival Inkjets, dimensions variable, 2011-2013

From a series of portraits of trans and queer subjects.

  Mal   Archival Inkjet, 20” x 30,” 2009  From a series of portraits of trans and queer subjects.

Mal

Archival Inkjet, 20” x 30,” 2009

From a series of portraits of trans and queer subjects.

  Valkyrie and Nacho   Archival Inkjet, 20” x 30,” 2018  From a series of portraits of trans and queer subjects.

Valkyrie and Nacho

Archival Inkjet, 20” x 30,” 2018

From a series of portraits of trans and queer subjects.

Freedom '17

Freedom ‘17
Digital video
Dimensions variable
6:38 (looped)

Performed to George Michael's Freedom '90

Made in collaboration with E.G. Crichton's curatorial project Out/Look the birth of the Queer, Freedom '17 playfully reflects on how much has changed in the U.S. since 1990 (the year that my inspirational issue of OUT/LOOK was published). My project playfully opens up critical refection on issues both within and outside of LGBTQ+ communities including gender, whiteness, performativity and how they intersect with issues around patriotism, and nationalism particularly during our current political climate. For more about the exhibition see: http://www.glbthistory.org/museum/

  Femme on Femme   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2009  From  Hyperqueereality    Hyperqueereality  exists on the wrong side of the proverbial tracks and is uninterested in moving toward the center of dominant culture. Instead Hyperqueereality like hooks’ writing invites the viewer away from the center and into the landscape of marginality.  This particular landscape of marginality exists somewhere between narcissistic fantasy and lived queer reality, perhaps utopia and/or perhaps dystopia. Its characters exist some times as superheroes and other times as antiheros, but ultimately as pluralistic protagonists.  By enticing the viewer into an alternate reality where queers are the koolist kids on the block and queer reality is the mode of existence  Hyperqueereality  compels us to identify with the possibility of redefinition and the reexamination of how we view, conceptualize and negotiate not only this specific body of photographic work but the ways in which we negotiate the world we inhabit.

Femme on Femme

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2009

From Hyperqueereality

Hyperqueereality exists on the wrong side of the proverbial tracks and is uninterested in moving toward the center of dominant culture. Instead Hyperqueereality like hooks’ writing invites the viewer away from the center and into the landscape of marginality.

This particular landscape of marginality exists somewhere between narcissistic fantasy and lived queer reality, perhaps utopia and/or perhaps dystopia. Its characters exist some times as superheroes and other times as antiheros, but ultimately as pluralistic protagonists.

By enticing the viewer into an alternate reality where queers are the koolist kids on the block and queer reality is the mode of existence Hyperqueereality compels us to identify with the possibility of redefinition and the reexamination of how we view, conceptualize and negotiate not only this specific body of photographic work but the ways in which we negotiate the world we inhabit.

  Miguel Y Miguelito   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2009  From  Hyperqueereality

Miguel Y Miguelito

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2009

From Hyperqueereality

  Tough and Dandy   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2009  From  Hyperqueereality

Tough and Dandy

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2009

From Hyperqueereality

  Her Selfie   Archival Inkjet, 5” x 7,” 2009  From  Love Ethic    I would rather be with her than anywhere else in the world. I want to protect her from everything past present and future. She means more to me than I can ever explain to you, so much that I am compelled to try.    Love Ethic  is an on going project about my partner, Libby. It is a portrait of her through my queer/trans/non-binary gaze and it is an exploration in making pictures from the place of a love ethic.

Her Selfie

Archival Inkjet, 5” x 7,” 2009

From Love Ethic

I would rather be with her than anywhere else in the world. I want to protect her from everything past present and future. She means more to me than I can ever explain to you, so much that I am compelled to try.

Love Ethic is an on going project about my partner, Libby. It is a portrait of her through my queer/trans/non-binary gaze and it is an exploration in making pictures from the place of a love ethic.

  Watchin’ you watch me   Archival Inkjet, 20” x 30,” 2009  From  Love Ethic

Watchin’ you watch me

Archival Inkjet, 20” x 30,” 2009

From Love Ethic

  In The Shower   Archival Inkjet, 26” x 40,” 2009  From  Love Ethic

In The Shower

Archival Inkjet, 26” x 40,” 2009

From Love Ethic

  Halo   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2009  From  Love Ethic

Halo

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2009

From Love Ethic

  Holdin' Hands   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2015  The project  Chingona Por Vida  investigates the shortcomings of visual perception and the complexity of intersectional Latinx and queer identities. Via photography, video, and installation, and through the lens of the central subject, Chingona, the project mines personal and familial histories of migration and assimilation as one family migrates from Mexico to the United States. Personal struggle for cultural recognition is explored alongside the complex and fraught history of the annexation of Mexico and its impact on geopolitics and individuals’ lives. Overlaying personal narrative, the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the current geopolitical situation of U.S. and Mexico border relations and immigration policies, the project seeks to both humanize and complicate the cultural understanding and perception of what it means to be Mexican American and queer Latinx today.
  California Dream   Archival Inkjet, 20” x 30,” 2015  From  Chingona Por Vida
  Chingona   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 48,” 2017  From  Chingona Por Vida
  Map of Mexifornia   Retouched and reprinted found maps, map tacs, text, various sizes aprox. 30” x 40,” 2017  From  Chingona Por Vida   Overlaying personal narrative, the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the current geopolitical situation of U.S. and Mexico border relations and immigration policies, the project seeks to both humanize and complicate the cultural understanding and perception of what it means to be Mexican American and queer Latinx today. Taking on the aesthetics of natural history museums the points of interest on the maps reflect points of personal and familiar import along with the history of the annexation of Mexico.  The treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. With the defeat of its army and the fall of the capital, in 1848 Mexico entered into negotiations to end the Mexican-American War (1846-48). February 2, 1848 the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was signed between the U.S. and Mexico, ending the war and forcing Mexico to give the U.S. 55% of its land. Mexico relinquished the territories of Alta California and Santa Fe de Nuevo Mexico – which are now the U.S. States of California, New Mexico, Utah, Colorado, Arizona and Texas. This unfair treaty paved the way for the national oppression of Chicano people in what had been the top half of Mexico and is now the Southwestern United States.
  Objetos Sagrados    Daguerreotype, 5” x 7,” 2016  From  Chingona Por Vida
  Criminal   Video, 4:07, dimensions variable, 2015  From  Gangsters Revisited
  Club Kid Corazón   Mixed media including, soft sculpture, feaux flowers, disco ball, pom poms, 10,’ x 10,’ x 15’, 2018  From  Alteras   Site specific, multi-media installation, exploring the intersectional border space of queer and Latinx community, inserting an expansive space of queer utopia and Latinx cultural worship into the physical space of the gallery. Part of a series of installations.  These alter installations take into account Mexican and LatinX traditions while also cross-pollinating said traditions with queer and trans histories, aesthetics and practices. Recalling members of the queer community we have lost and celebrating them while also demonstrating an intersectional queer utopian impulse toward remembering our ancestors while fighting for the future.  Dia de Los Muertos is a multi-day holiday, celebrated in early November throughout LatinX cultures especially in Mexico, where it originated. It draws on indigenous Mexican traditions and is observed throughout the world particularly by people of Mexican ancestry. Di de Los Muertos celebrates the lives of the deceased with food, drink, parties, and activities the dead enjoyed in life. Alters are a typical cultural form of recognition of the dead during this holiday.
  Gender is a Drag (Triptych)   Archival Inkjets, dimensions variable, 2016-ongoing    From ongoing project  Gender is a Drag   The series,  Gender is a Drag , a photo and video based work that explores and expands the space of non-binary gender. These photograph are part of a body of work comprised of videos and stills documenting the transformations I undergo due to taking hormones. There are also videos in which I discuss various topics related to gender in general, gender theory, my own experience and concepts that I am researching in conjunction with this work. Being white, able-bodied and often viewed as masculine, allows me to remain relatively safe as a non-binary person. I am in a position where I can use my privilege to make more space for non-binary and gender non-conforming people.
  Needle and Vial   Archival Inkjet, dimensions variable, 2017  From ongoing project  Gender is a Drag
  Shot   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2018  From ongoing project  Gender is a Drag
  Shot   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2018  From ongoing project  Gender is a Drag
  Evolve   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2017  From ongoing project  Gender is a Drag
  Gender Is A Drag   Video, 5:52, dimensions variable, 2018  From ongoing project  Gender is a Drag   With the increasingly popularized use of “they” as a non-binary gendered singular pronoun, people are becoming aware that not everyone fits neatly under the pronoun she or he. Rather than being excited by the possibility of new ways of being, when met with expansive forms of self-expression (i.e. people who are gender non-conforming and/or non-binary, and/or non-binary trans) most people are frightened and / or enraged by the existence of people who present identities that have not been authorized by dominant culture. We see this regularly in with the rights for trans bathroom bills, with the murder of gender non-conforming people and violence and hate crimes perpetrated against non-binary people.
  The Living Room   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2014  From an ongoing body of work investigating addiction, dysfunction, familial relations and the struggle of working class Americans.
  Kurt and Kenny   Archival Inkjet, 40” x 50,” 2017  From an ongoing body of work investigating addiction, dysfunction, familial relations and the struggle of working class Americans.
  Logan Before and After   Archival Inkjets, dimensions variable, 2011-2013  From a series of portraits of trans and queer subjects.
  Mal   Archival Inkjet, 20” x 30,” 2009  From a series of portraits of trans and queer subjects.
  Valkyrie and Nacho   Archival Inkjet, 20” x 30,” 2018  From a series of portraits of trans and queer subjects.
Freedom '17
  Femme on Femme   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2009  From  Hyperqueereality    Hyperqueereality  exists on the wrong side of the proverbial tracks and is uninterested in moving toward the center of dominant culture. Instead Hyperqueereality like hooks’ writing invites the viewer away from the center and into the landscape of marginality.  This particular landscape of marginality exists somewhere between narcissistic fantasy and lived queer reality, perhaps utopia and/or perhaps dystopia. Its characters exist some times as superheroes and other times as antiheros, but ultimately as pluralistic protagonists.  By enticing the viewer into an alternate reality where queers are the koolist kids on the block and queer reality is the mode of existence  Hyperqueereality  compels us to identify with the possibility of redefinition and the reexamination of how we view, conceptualize and negotiate not only this specific body of photographic work but the ways in which we negotiate the world we inhabit.
  Miguel Y Miguelito   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2009  From  Hyperqueereality
  Tough and Dandy   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2009  From  Hyperqueereality
  Her Selfie   Archival Inkjet, 5” x 7,” 2009  From  Love Ethic    I would rather be with her than anywhere else in the world. I want to protect her from everything past present and future. She means more to me than I can ever explain to you, so much that I am compelled to try.    Love Ethic  is an on going project about my partner, Libby. It is a portrait of her through my queer/trans/non-binary gaze and it is an exploration in making pictures from the place of a love ethic.
  Watchin’ you watch me   Archival Inkjet, 20” x 30,” 2009  From  Love Ethic
  In The Shower   Archival Inkjet, 26” x 40,” 2009  From  Love Ethic
  Halo   Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2009  From  Love Ethic

Holdin' Hands

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2015

The project Chingona Por Vida investigates the shortcomings of visual perception and the complexity of intersectional Latinx and queer identities. Via photography, video, and installation, and through the lens of the central subject, Chingona, the project mines personal and familial histories of migration and assimilation as one family migrates from Mexico to the United States. Personal struggle for cultural recognition is explored alongside the complex and fraught history of the annexation of Mexico and its impact on geopolitics and individuals’ lives. Overlaying personal narrative, the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the current geopolitical situation of U.S. and Mexico border relations and immigration policies, the project seeks to both humanize and complicate the cultural understanding and perception of what it means to be Mexican American and queer Latinx today.

California Dream

Archival Inkjet, 20” x 30,” 2015

From Chingona Por Vida

Chingona

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 48,” 2017

From Chingona Por Vida

Map of Mexifornia

Retouched and reprinted found maps, map tacs, text, various sizes aprox. 30” x 40,” 2017

From Chingona Por Vida

Overlaying personal narrative, the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the current geopolitical situation of U.S. and Mexico border relations and immigration policies, the project seeks to both humanize and complicate the cultural understanding and perception of what it means to be Mexican American and queer Latinx today. Taking on the aesthetics of natural history museums the points of interest on the maps reflect points of personal and familiar import along with the history of the annexation of Mexico.

The treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. With the defeat of its army and the fall of the capital, in 1848 Mexico entered into negotiations to end the Mexican-American War (1846-48). February 2, 1848 the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was signed between the U.S. and Mexico, ending the war and forcing Mexico to give the U.S. 55% of its land. Mexico relinquished the territories of Alta California and Santa Fe de Nuevo Mexico – which are now the U.S. States of California, New Mexico, Utah, Colorado, Arizona and Texas. This unfair treaty paved the way for the national oppression of Chicano people in what had been the top half of Mexico and is now the Southwestern United States.

Objetos Sagrados

Daguerreotype, 5” x 7,” 2016

From Chingona Por Vida

Criminal

Video, 4:07, dimensions variable, 2015

From Gangsters Revisited

Club Kid Corazón

Mixed media including, soft sculpture, feaux flowers, disco ball, pom poms, 10,’ x 10,’ x 15’, 2018

From Alteras

Site specific, multi-media installation, exploring the intersectional border space of queer and Latinx community, inserting an expansive space of queer utopia and Latinx cultural worship into the physical space of the gallery. Part of a series of installations.

These alter installations take into account Mexican and LatinX traditions while also cross-pollinating said traditions with queer and trans histories, aesthetics and practices. Recalling members of the queer community we have lost and celebrating them while also demonstrating an intersectional queer utopian impulse toward remembering our ancestors while fighting for the future.

Dia de Los Muertos is a multi-day holiday, celebrated in early November throughout LatinX cultures especially in Mexico, where it originated. It draws on indigenous Mexican traditions and is observed throughout the world particularly by people of Mexican ancestry. Di de Los Muertos celebrates the lives of the deceased with food, drink, parties, and activities the dead enjoyed in life. Alters are a typical cultural form of recognition of the dead during this holiday.

Gender is a Drag (Triptych)

Archival Inkjets, dimensions variable, 2016-ongoing

From ongoing project Gender is a Drag

The series, Gender is a Drag, a photo and video based work that explores and expands the space of non-binary gender. These photograph are part of a body of work comprised of videos and stills documenting the transformations I undergo due to taking hormones. There are also videos in which I discuss various topics related to gender in general, gender theory, my own experience and concepts that I am researching in conjunction with this work. Being white, able-bodied and often viewed as masculine, allows me to remain relatively safe as a non-binary person. I am in a position where I can use my privilege to make more space for non-binary and gender non-conforming people.

Needle and Vial

Archival Inkjet, dimensions variable, 2017

From ongoing project Gender is a Drag

Shot

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2018

From ongoing project Gender is a Drag

Shot

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2018

From ongoing project Gender is a Drag

Evolve

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2017

From ongoing project Gender is a Drag

Gender Is A Drag

Video, 5:52, dimensions variable, 2018

From ongoing project Gender is a Drag

With the increasingly popularized use of “they” as a non-binary gendered singular pronoun, people are becoming aware that not everyone fits neatly under the pronoun she or he. Rather than being excited by the possibility of new ways of being, when met with expansive forms of self-expression (i.e. people who are gender non-conforming and/or non-binary, and/or non-binary trans) most people are frightened and / or enraged by the existence of people who present identities that have not been authorized by dominant culture. We see this regularly in with the rights for trans bathroom bills, with the murder of gender non-conforming people and violence and hate crimes perpetrated against non-binary people.

The Living Room

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2014

From an ongoing body of work investigating addiction, dysfunction, familial relations and the struggle of working class Americans.

Kurt and Kenny

Archival Inkjet, 40” x 50,” 2017

From an ongoing body of work investigating addiction, dysfunction, familial relations and the struggle of working class Americans.

Logan Before and After

Archival Inkjets, dimensions variable, 2011-2013

From a series of portraits of trans and queer subjects.

Mal

Archival Inkjet, 20” x 30,” 2009

From a series of portraits of trans and queer subjects.

Valkyrie and Nacho

Archival Inkjet, 20” x 30,” 2018

From a series of portraits of trans and queer subjects.

Freedom '17

Freedom ‘17
Digital video
Dimensions variable
6:38 (looped)

Performed to George Michael's Freedom '90

Made in collaboration with E.G. Crichton's curatorial project Out/Look the birth of the Queer, Freedom '17 playfully reflects on how much has changed in the U.S. since 1990 (the year that my inspirational issue of OUT/LOOK was published). My project playfully opens up critical refection on issues both within and outside of LGBTQ+ communities including gender, whiteness, performativity and how they intersect with issues around patriotism, and nationalism particularly during our current political climate. For more about the exhibition see: http://www.glbthistory.org/museum/

Femme on Femme

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2009

From Hyperqueereality

Hyperqueereality exists on the wrong side of the proverbial tracks and is uninterested in moving toward the center of dominant culture. Instead Hyperqueereality like hooks’ writing invites the viewer away from the center and into the landscape of marginality.

This particular landscape of marginality exists somewhere between narcissistic fantasy and lived queer reality, perhaps utopia and/or perhaps dystopia. Its characters exist some times as superheroes and other times as antiheros, but ultimately as pluralistic protagonists.

By enticing the viewer into an alternate reality where queers are the koolist kids on the block and queer reality is the mode of existence Hyperqueereality compels us to identify with the possibility of redefinition and the reexamination of how we view, conceptualize and negotiate not only this specific body of photographic work but the ways in which we negotiate the world we inhabit.

Miguel Y Miguelito

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2009

From Hyperqueereality

Tough and Dandy

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2009

From Hyperqueereality

Her Selfie

Archival Inkjet, 5” x 7,” 2009

From Love Ethic

I would rather be with her than anywhere else in the world. I want to protect her from everything past present and future. She means more to me than I can ever explain to you, so much that I am compelled to try.

Love Ethic is an on going project about my partner, Libby. It is a portrait of her through my queer/trans/non-binary gaze and it is an exploration in making pictures from the place of a love ethic.

Watchin’ you watch me

Archival Inkjet, 20” x 30,” 2009

From Love Ethic

In The Shower

Archival Inkjet, 26” x 40,” 2009

From Love Ethic

Halo

Archival Inkjet, 30” x 40,” 2009

From Love Ethic

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